Description

Our First Response service offers support 24 hours a day, seven days a week to people of all ages living in Bradford, Airedale, Wharfedale or Craven experiencing a mental health crisis.

Mental ill health is common, with 1 in 4 people in the UK experiencing a problem each year. Most conditions are managed well through medication and/or therapy, but if your first experience of mental ill health is a crisis, or if you have an existing problem, we want you to feel reassured that trained professionals are just a phone call away.

Contact

Telephone: 01274 221181

Who is this service for?

This service is for people of all ages living in Bradford, Airedale, Wharfedale or Craven experiencing a mental health crisis.

You do not have to have used any mental health services before to contact us.

How can you access this service?

Where possible the person who is experiencing the crisis should contact First Response, but we understand that this is not always possible and accept calls from others, concerned about the person’s well-being.

You do not have to have used any mental health services before to contact us.

You can call First Response 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Where can you see the First Response team?

Once you call First Response a telecoach will answer and quickly assess your needs. They’re experienced to talk to people in distress and provide guidance to help you manage the situation and your feelings.

They may decide you need urgent support. In this case they will ask a first responder from our team to visit you as soon as possible. First responders are mental health nurses and social workers. They visit you wherever you are in your time of crisis, at whatever time of day, sometimes with a member of the emergency services.  Or you could be referred to one of our three safer spaces for people of any age experiencing mental health crisis, in Bradford, Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven. They offer a warm, calm and safe environment, 365 days a year, as a possible alternative to A&E. See our short video for more details.

What is a crisis?

If you are experiencing something which makes you feel unsafe, distressed or worried about your mental health you should contact First Response. Examples might include:

  • Mood changes (different to how you are usually).
  • Withdrawing from people (close family, friends or work colleagues).
  • Not taking care of yourself like you would usually.
  • Having increased thoughts about life not being worth living.
  • Excessive worry.
  • Feeling out of control.
  • Feeling unable to cope.
  • Changes in the way you think.
  • Unusual ideas.
  • Hearing voices, or seeing things that others can’t.
  • Thinking about harming yourself or someone else.

A telecoach will answer and quickly assess your needs. Calls received Monday –Friday between 9am-5pm will be answered in the first instance by a clinical administrator at Single Point of Access who will take your details before transferring your call to an appropriate clinician.

They’re experienced to talk to people in distress and provide guidance to help you manage the situation and your feelings.

They have information on all the health, social and voluntary services available to support you. They will refer or make an appointment if it is needed.

They may decide you need urgent support. In this case they will ask a first responder from our team to visit you as soon as possible.

First responders are mental health nurses and social workers.

They visit you wherever you are in your time of crisis, at whatever time of day, sometimes with a member of the emergency services.

They provide support to help you manage your feelings. Some can prescribe medication.

First responders provide the best possible action for you at the time. They aim to keep you at home with support, working with you to develop a crisis management plan.

If you are extremely unwell they may recommend you are admitted to hospital.

At Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust we have radically re-designed our mental health services to give people who are experiencing a mental health crisis a single point of access – one phone number – so that people get the help they need, close to home.

The re-design covered all mental health services, including our award-winning urgent care First Response  to provide a joined-up approach across health and care. Working closely with West Yorkshire Police, Bradford Council and voluntary partners, the approach means that people are supported earlier to prevent crisis, and in the least restrictive setting.

Reducing demands on A&E

The innovative approach means that since March 2015, no-one in Bradford, Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven has travelled out of area for urgent mental health care – that used to cost £1.8 million (2014/15) – because they are getting the right care, in the right place, with the right healthcare professional, close to home.   In turn, this has reduced demands on A&E, on average by around 60%, and  around 50% fewer people are being sectioned under 136 of the Mental Health Act, (that enables the police to admit someone to a hospital for assessment or treatment) because people are getting the right care earlier, to meet their needs.

As a result, the Trust is already delivering a number of the commitments in the national Five Year Forward View (FYFV) for mental health and has been cited as good practice by NHS England.

Urgent care close to home

The Care Trust’s urgent care service includes:

  • First Response service providing 24/7 crisis care, with a single phone number for people to get urgent care – people can ‘self-refer’ and talk to a tele-coach (a psychological therapist) for support; for those that need more intensive support, a First Responder (a more advanced practitioner) sees people wherever they are, within the hour.
  • Three safer spaces run by local voluntary partners
    • the Sanctuary run by Mind, provides a safe space for people that have called First Response, 6pm-11pm; most people are then able to go home.
    • Haven, a day-time adult mental health service, which is open from 10am-6pm, based at the Cellar Trust in Shipley. Haven plays a vital role in identifying crisis triggers early and preventing a crisis from escalating. People in the local area, when they reach out to services for help and support, receive the right help, with kind and compassionate staff at the times when they need them most, without having to attend A&E.
    • Safer space – which provides a homely and welcoming overnight place for vulnerable children and young people aged under 18 to visit in emotional distress or crisis from 10 pm to 10 am, which is run in partnership with Creative Support.
  • Mental health staff in police control rooms, A&E and custody suites – our staff give ‘real-time’ advice to the police and ambulance service, so they can identify when mental health may be a factor in incidents, and advise on decisions linked to the Mental Health Act; our staff are also based in police custody suites to support people with mental health problems.
  • Trust staff trained as special police officers – a cohort of the Trust’s mental health professionals are trained as special police officers, going out on patrol with regular officers, to improve the care of individuals in mental health crisis.  Six hospital staff have been trained and are now ‘on the beat’ two days a month, with a further cohort of six to ten staff from the Trust’s community mental health teams undergoing the same training in 2017/18.
  • Social workers and a housing worker are part of the First Response team – the housing worker helps people find accommodation when they are leaving hospital, so they can be supported in the community as soon as they are able.
  • More targeted community mental health support for people with enduring mental health problems – the 24/7 First Response service means staff in the Trust’s community mental health teams can now focus on people with enduring mental health problems who can be cared for at home, rather than handling crisis care, ensuring that people stay well at home.